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Summer Arts Intensives

Ann Clarke

Dates: May 24-June 29, 2019
Opening Reception: Saturday, May 25, 4-7 pm
Location: Kaaterskill Fine Arts Gallery, Hunter Village Square, 7950 Main Street, Village of Hunter
Gallery Hours: Friday, Saturday & Monday, 11 am-5:30 pm; Sunday 11 am-4:00 PM
More Information: 518 263 2060

Image at left: Math Notes Night, 85.5" x 59"
At right: Math Notes Day, 73" x 50"

History Lessons

The Catskill Mountain Foundation’s Kaaterskill Fine Arts Gallery is delighted to present the textile-based works of Ann Clarke. Ms. Clarke is Associate Professor of Visual Art and Dean Emeritus at Syracuse University.

Her work transcends the traditional boundaries of textile art forms, joining the realms of drawing and painting with a distinct visual presence and engaging content.

Robert Tomlinson
Director, Kaaterskill Fine Arts Gallery


This body of work is connected by the use of text, readable and not—a found letter, old study notes and archived images of papers from historic figures long gone—sometimes layered and juxtaposed with figurative images from past and present reflecting a constantly fluid expression of time.

I live at an intersection where my present life meets with caring for my 98.5-year-old mother who is physically robust, but whose mind is ravaged by dementia.  For her, shifting shards of her life stick and unstick, fold and reform resulting in momentary reconstructed narratives that affirm and unnervingly challenge my understandings.

Ideas are powerful. I have always cared about accuracy, about pinning down that which can be, as a truth. Given how complex truth can be this strategy often resulted in work that sprung from linear time lines—short stories with a beginning, middle and end, so to speak. The extremely relative experience of time I witness and share with my mother has upended some of these foundational ideas I have used to situate myself in the world, in time, in life.

I care deeply about making work that is inherently an invitation. Textiles are ubiquitous, from a well-worn dish cloth to a carefully cleaned and stored wedding dress—spanning the depth of meaning from the everyday to the special and unique.  Embracing function in the obvious form of the rug in this series seemed most in keeping with ideas of what is foundational, quite simply that which is stood upon, and putting the rug on the wall, is literally reorienting that idea.

I pursue work that is compelling and beautiful as well as dissonant and unnerving.

—Ann Clarke

 

 

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